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What do Tigers, trucks, kitchens, upstairs and a leash mean in a dream?

widescreen_tiger-wide

Dream 429: Keeping My Shadow on a Leash

A woman had the following dream:

“I don’t remember all of the dream but it was a tiger in my dream.  The tiger was already like a pet in the dream, the tiger was already a part of the house.  I think I was cooking fish or salmon.    When I went downstairs with the food, the tiger was following me and looking strange with his mouth.  It scared me so I ran upstairs to my family.

I was telling them, “okay, we got to get rid of this tiger because I don’t feel safe anymore.” So the Tiger followed me up the steps and went into my closet and fell on my brother that is deceased and my oldest brother’s talking.  They went into the next room, and when my deceased brother came out, he said it won’t happen again.  He said, “I promise this won’t happen ever again about the tiger” as if he were the one who brought the tiger there, but then tiger was gone.  Then I was outside, I was like near a road.  A truck went by and, lo and behold, it was a tiger laying on the back of the truck….

Interpretation

Animals usually represent our instincts in dreams. A tiger is a very powerful symbol. It usually is good to have powerful animals in your dreams because it means you have a lot of instinctive energy in your subconscious.

This tiger may represent the shadow side of your instincts to some degree, but it is a very well-controlled Shadow. You have it on a leash. I believe part of the concern is you don’t want to feed the energy of the Shadow for fear it might get out of hand and harm you.

A house can represent the dreamer to some extent because it is a framework out of which you live. When you move from upstairs to downstairs you’re basically moving from your brain to the kitchen which is basically a place of nurture and creativity. You expressly do not want to feed the Tiger. You don’t want to give more energy to your Shadow side even though it’s well-controlled.

I am guessing that at least one of the brothers represents the heroic masculine. This is good news because it’s used to represent a spiritual dimension since one of them is deceased. Your heroic masculine archetype, the part of you the does helpful and positive things for yourself and others, apologizes for bringing the spirit of the tiger to your consciousness to the point where it scares you. One might say it scares you to death almost.

The dream ends with the deceased brother promising you that it won’t happen again. But you know the way Shadows are, they just don’t go easy. You see the tiger pass by on the truck after you think you’ve gotten rid of it.

The dream is reassuring you that you can’t just get rid of your shadow. You need your shadow, particularly in situations like work which I think is represented by the truck because trucks usually do work-related things. Your Shadow is also your get-up-and-go, it just needs contact with other parts your personality so it doesn’t get out of control.

Get more in touch with your Shadow through my book which is at http://www.drstevenfox.com

 

 

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What does a house mean in a dream?

At home with yourself
A House Can Be the Dreamer to Some Extent

Dream Answer 296

A house can represent the dreamer to some extent because it is the framework out of which one lives. This is especially the case if it was a house in which the dreamer once lived.

The ages the dreamer was when living in the house (from birth to five years old, from age 12 to 16 years old, etc.) is important. There is something about the dreamer’s present psychodynamics that is situationally similar to the dreamer’s earlier psychodynamics at a specific developmental stage reflected in the dream.

The different areas of the house correspond roughly to different areas of the dreamer’s life. Mental or intellectual processes are associated with the upper floors or roof. An open roof may be a comment on how open minded the dreamer’s mind is, how the dreamer does not protect his thoughts efficiently, or how incomplete and unfinished his or her thoughts are in the sense of being “under construction.”

The family room may be demonstrating family dynamics. The dining room can be associated with how people in the home nurture one another. The garage can represent how people plan to move within their lives.

The living room represents the dreamer’s living space in her life. The kitchen can stand for his creativity since the cook prepares nurturing and creative combinations of food in the kitchen. The subterranean basement can often be a sign of the subconscious because it underlies the reality of the dreamer’s life.

Buildings can signal different portions of the dreamer’s life. Resorts may represent the dreamer’s recreational life or may simply be a “last resort.” Skyscrapers indicate cosmopolitan interests.

Farms may represent ingrained hard work values or bucolic serenity. Universities and, in particular, high schools usually indicate what the dreamer needs to learn in life. Dreams cannot resist using “high school” as a place for your “higher self” to learn.

Dreams cannot resist the metaphor of trains and train stations as a place where you “get your life on track.” Terminals frequently mean where you want to get to in life before you die (before your life is terminated). Airports often signal movement toward higher or spiritual goals in the dreamer’s life.

Shopping malls are frequent in dreams. Dreams cannot resist the play upon words. Dreams often use shopping malls to show how the dreamer has been “mauled” (malled?) in life usually in the person’s career or business life as a shopping mall is a commercial community.

Apartments often suggest only a part, and probably a transitional part, is going to be addressed in the dream. The setting of the dream is almost always important, especially the initial setting. The opening scene often signals what the dream is going to be about. The setting shows the field or area of the dreamer’s life where the subconscious psychodynamics are going to be played out. The above meanings should be seen as tentative hypotheses that the dreamer can confirm or give additional information about.

Help confirm your direction in life through dreams at http://www.drstevenfox.com

Scaring Myself

gaff-rigged-sailboat-in-lagoonDream 207: Scaring Myself

A 42-year-old man dreamt that he was sailing across a lake with a small, sleek and beautiful sailboat. The lake was crystal clear water. At some point, he decided to enter a lagoon surrounded by dense forest and plants.

He wanted to go ashore, but the shallow water was murky with a soft and muddy bottom. He did not want to walk through the mud to get ashore. He suddenly flew to the house he grew up in located near the lagoon. He went up a set of stairs to the second floor where his progress was blocked by a vertically  sliding closed door. He slide the wooden door open to find a little boy who made animal noises and tried to scare him. He wondered what to do with the little boy.

Dream 207 Interpretation

A lake is local or familiar emotion. The dream indicated that he was navigating (the sailboat) his emotions relatively well, although he had some challenges represented by his sailing against the wind. The dreamer was a long time alcoholic who had been sober for over a year.

The lagoon represented a place of growth within himself given the plants and trees. The dream noted that his internal little boy was the problem. His immature emotions frightened himself by pointing to what he potentially could do when in immature contact with his instincts. The dream implies that he needs to work on the little boy in his head (the house represented the dreamer to some extent and the little boy being upstairs emphasized how immature instincts affected his thinking).

**This dream was interpreted using the forty dream interpretation rules from my book, Dreams: Guide to the Soul which is at  http://www.drstevenfox.com